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Study Shows Canadians’ Mental Health Declines While on Vacation

Research from digital health platform Felix reveals the mental health challenges Canadians face while on vacation.

The report, released last month, found that one in four people say their mental health is getting worse these days as many people experience a mix of emotions. Felix’s chief medical officer, Dr Kelly Anderson, said the holidays were “a time to turn everything around”.

“We’re traveling, we’re not eating what we usually eat, it’s darker than usual.”

Anderson adds that some may feel lonely and isolated.

READ: What Convictions Mean for Mentality

The survey also found that depression and anxiety are the most common mental health problems, affecting 39% of Canadians. In addition, almost 60 percent of respondents said they would seek treatment or go more often if it were cheaper.

Olabiyi Dipeolu understood the need and inequality in access to work, that’s why he created Maqoba.com. This is a website that sells merchandise to raise money for mental health initiatives and charities. The platform also offers free mental health resources to its users. Dipeolu said: “Because of the history of Canada, some groups are isolated and they don’t have opportunities, either from the workplace or from different organizations.

Anderson says when it comes to dealing with your mental health issues these days, it’s best to stick to the basics. Some of his top tips include:

Take care of your physical health by getting enough sleep, exercising regularly and eating a healthy diet.
Pay attention to your social media consumption.

Consider contacting a friend or family member.
He says to try to meet people “face to face”.

“This type of connection, even if it’s short, can be really useful.”

If you or someone you know is in trouble and needs help, resources are available. In an emergency, please call 911 for immediate assistance.

Crisis Canada’s toll-free helpline offers 24/7 support at 1-833-456-4566. The toll-free Kids Helpline at 1-800-668-6868 has 24/7 support for youth and a crisis text line, which can be reached by texting HOME to 686868.

The non-profit HOPE for Medical Assistance provides 24/7 support for citizens at 1-855-242-3310. Online chat service is also available.

Read: Hormones vs. Mental Health

Trans Lifeline operates a toll-free helpline for trans and people with questions at 1-877-330-6366.

Demand for mental health services has increased, pushing some providers to their limits

Psychiatrists say demand for their services has increased because of the epidemic, with long waiting lists, fewer affordable options and increasingly limited therapists.

According to a recent survey by the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Ontario, a quarter of all people in Ontario needed mental health support in February, a significant increase from 9% of respondents. said that they have sought help in a similar election. from the meeting two years ago. Almost half of respondents to the February poll said their mental health had deteriorated since the start of the pandemic and almost a quarter said they had consumed too much alcohol, wine and tobacco than before the disease 온라인카지노.

What it does not capture, however, is the number of people who are turned away by a provider, either because the patient list is full or because the provider is full that day. . Several counseling centers and clinics in London, Ont., called by CBC News, have pre-recorded messages warning new clients of long wait times and late responses to their inquiries.

Increasing demand

Jordan Thomas, a social worker and clinical director of the London Center for Trauma Therapy, opened in October 2020 as the epidemic continues. Soon, it was flooded with customers looking for support they couldn’t find anywhere else.

“Infectious diseases and forced isolation and lack of access to fulfilling activities have worsened their already dire situation,” he said. “What we’ve seen is a lot of depression, a lot of frustration, powerlessness, lack of optimism about the future.”

“There has been a real increase in the number of people seeking mental health support.”

This increase is also seen in the number of people calling the CHMA Thames Valley Addiction and Mental Health Services Crisis and Support Line. The service saw a 26% increase in call volume in the first year of the disease, from 39,229 c.

He said, “You can only provide a good service if you take care of yourself, so as an employer, we really try to help people relax, help them and their schedule, if they are sick, let them stay at home,” he said. Mitchell said the pandemic is encouraging at first as it is forcing providers to find new ways to help clients, whether through virtual therapy or delivery to clients. hot food by the window.

“If it doesn’t stop, no matter who you are, what you do, or how strong you are, it’s going to take a toll on yourself,” she said. Now that the epidemic has largely subsided, Mitchell said inflation and rising living standards are starting to add to the growing list of factors that make people’s mental health worse.

“For some people it’s hitting them harder than COVID,” he said, adding that while he’s optimistic about the future, things could get worse before they get better. about the state of mental health in the country. “The real impact may take us a little while to see because people don’t spend days now,” Mitchell said.

“We’re being cautious in our predictions, but we believe that [the impact of the epidemic] will last on the mental health side for more than three years.