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Recommendations for Regular Self-exams to Screen for Breast Cancer Can Seem Confusing

Doctors often encourage women to have monthly check-ups and use certain screening methods. Today, doctors encourage women with average cancer to be aware of breast changes and leave it to individuals to find the best way to monitor breast health at home.

Why is this happening and what can you do to make yourself stronger? These important questions need to be answered, since breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the country, behind skin cancer. Breast cancer accounts for about 30% – or 1 in 3 – of new cancers diagnosed in women each year. The American Cancer Society estimates that there will be more 카지노사이트 than 287,000 new cases of breast cancer and more than 51,000 new cases of ductal carcinoma in situ in 2022, with the diagnosis increasing slowly at 0.5% per year. Men may also be at risk of breast cancer, although the lifetime risk is 1 in 833 men compared to 1 in 8 women. Fortunately, breast cancer death rates have decreased since 1989, in part due to awareness and early detection.

Change of Mind

Health care providers are always on the lookout for breast cancer. Physicians spend time teaching patients a method for testing, and health centers support self-testing education campaigns.

The idea is that early detection of breast cancer will:

Leads to early detection and treatment. Prevent cancer from spreading to other parts of the body.
Improve your chances of survival. But while some women had breast exams, others did not. And for those who don’t, guilt sometimes enters the picture. “There are many women who come into the clinic, when they are asked if they are doing their tests, they panic and say that they are not doing the expected procedure. There is shame,” said Dr. Therese Bevers, a professor of clinical cancer prevention and clinical director of the Center for Prevention and Prevention Outreach Programs at MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas in Houston, Texas. In the early 2000s, thinking about self-assessment began to change. It comes from a large randomized study published on October 2, 2002 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, which found that the tests did not reduce the number of people who die from breast cancer and may increase the risk for women of getting biopsies for lumps and. turned out to be non-cancerous. Some research studies have come to similar conclusions.

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Health care providers are always on the lookout for breast cancer. Physicians spend time teaching patients a method for testing, and health centers support self-testing education campaigns.

The idea is that early detection of breast cancer will:

Leads to early detection and treatment. Prevent cancer from spreading to other parts of the body.
Improve your chances of survival. But while some women had breast exams, others did not. And for those who don’t, guilt sometimes enters the picture. “There are many women who come into the clinic, when they are asked if they are doing their tests, they panic and say that they are not doing the expected procedure. There is shame,” said Dr. Therese Bevers, a professor of cancer prevention and clinical director of the Center for Prevention and Prevention Outreach Programs at MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas in Houston, Texas. In the early 2000s, thinking about self-assessment began to change. It comes from a large randomized study published on October 2, 2002 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, which found that the tests did not reduce the number of people who die from breast cancer and may increase the risk for women of getting biopsies for lumps and. turned out to be non-cancerous. Some research studies have come to similar conclusions.

There are no good or bad reviews

The concept of self-awareness doesn’t mean you can’t do self-examination. Nita Landry, a gynecologist in the United States, said, “With self-examination, there are no hard and fast guidelines for what method to use or how often to check your breast.” “Instead, you focus on general awareness of how your breast is and feels so you can quickly see if anything changes.

This method makes for more understanding, Bevers says, since self-exams aren’t often how to diagnose breast cancer at home.

“In fact, most breast cancers are detected during routine activities such as bathing, grooming, or shaving,” Bevers says. Breast self-awareness methods also include educating women about strategies that have been shown to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer. These preventive measures include:

  • Exercise regularly.
  • Load management.
  • Take the drug tamoxifen (Soltamox) in severe cases.

How to do a self-assessment
If you want to do your own research, this specific process is for you. For example, you can:

Stand up or lie down and do the research.
Get in the shower and wash your breasts. Place your arms behind your head and use your fingers to feel for breast changes.
Press firmly or gently. “It’s all you can do to check your heart properly,” Bevers says. “Some women put their fingers on their chests and circle around. Some do spokes on wheels – inside and outside, up and down.”
Another way to examine your breasts is to look at them closely under a bright light. You can stand in front of a mirror to do this or look at your chest.

What are you looking for? There is no single change that indicates breast cancer. It’s different for every woman. Breast changes can include anything new or different to you, such as:

A thickening of the breast tissue.
Redness of the breast tissue. Dimples on the chest skin.
A discharge from the nipple. Breast swelling.
An unusual number on the breast or under the arm. “You may have symptoms that aren’t on the list,” Bevers says. “If you notice a change or just have a hunch, call your doctor.”

How about finding something new? Pick up the phone as soon as possible and call your healthcare provider if anything about your breast seems new or different.

What will happen? Your doctor will need to see you right away for a physical exam and order a 3D mammogram and ultrasound.

If these test results are negative, your doctor may:

Order a biopsy (performed by a radiologist) to get a tissue sample, then give you advice on next steps once the results come back. Consult your general surgeon or oncologist before ordering a biopsy. “A breast surgeon can review the imaging results and advise the patient on further procedures. A biopsy will probably not be necessary. If so, the patient will know what to expect, and will not have to worry about other things to do while waiting for the results,” said Dr. Yana Markidan, a gynecologist based in Princeton, New Jersey says. If the result is not a cause for concern
It is not always the result of breast cancer.

“Often, you’ll be told you have benign cystitis (a cyst filled with fluid),” Landry says. “If you have a more suspicious area, you may come back in a few months for repeat imaging to see if the mass or cyst has grown or changed. Or you may need a biopsy.” .

In the meantime, you can go back to your previous breastfeeding routine or start one if you haven’t already. With 50% to 70% of breast cancer diagnosed by patients themselves, this may be something you should consider.